Bloomfield Hills, MI— At its November 5, 2013 board meeting, The Jewish Fund approved a total of $703,163 in grant awards, including $350,973 for continuation of multi-year grants and $352,190 in new grants. The board also re-elected Dr. Richard Krugel of Bloomfield Hills, MI as its Chairman and re-elected Karen Sosnick Schoenberg as its Vice-Chair, for terms beginning in January 2014.  Newly elected board members are Jeffrey Davidson of Birmingham, Ronald Klein of Bloomfield Hills, and Michael Tyson of Detroit. At its annual meeting held immediately following the board meeting, the annual Robert Sosnick Award of Excellence was presented to Fair Food Network for its Double-Up Food Bucks program.  President and CEO Oran Hesterman, accepted the award on behalf of the organization. The following grants were approved:

New Grants Approved

Affirmations:  $52,440 for the first year of a three-year, $158,630 grant to improve access to quality healthcare for LGBT people through cultural competency trainings for nurses.

Detroit Central City Community Mental Health:  $60,000 for the first year of a three-year, $180,000 grant to support the operations of a new integrated health center.

Friendship Circle:  $40,000 for the first year of a three-year, $120,000 grant to develop a satellite program in Oak Park.

Jewish Community Center of Metropolitan Detroit:  $50,750 for the first year of a three- year, $187,260 grant to hire a community music therapist to be shared amongst three Jewish communal agencies..

Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit:  $51,000 for the first year of a three-year, $186,000 grant to expand services to students with special needs in the area’s Jewish day schools.

Southeastern Michigan Health Association for CLEARCorps Detroit:  $80,000 for the first year of a two-year, $150,000 grant to pilot Healthy Homes + Asthma, designed to reduce asthma and prevent lead poisoning in preschool age children in Detroit.

Continuation Grants Approved

Alternatives for Girls:  $50,000 for the third year of a three year, $150,000 grant to expand the agency’s walk-in and phone-line services into a comprehensive suite of on-site crisis and health programming for high-risk girls and women

Children’s Trust Fund of Southeast Michigan:  $49,333 for the third year of a three year, $148,000 grant to help prevent the deaths and side effects of Shaken Baby Syndrome in infants by educating parents of newborns on how to deal with the normal crying of an infant.

Jewish Family Service:  $29,500 for the third year of a three year, $82,400 grant for Project Build, a program to help older adults, people with disabilities, and low-income individuals and families to remain living independently in safe, functional and barrier-free homes.

Jewish Senior Life: $57,140 for the second year of a three-year, $187,320 grant to create a “Village” model of community support benefiting Jewish older adults with the goal of aging in place.

JVS:  $60,000 for the second year of a two-year, $120,000 grant to subsidize program fees for low income Jewish adults to learn computer skills for the purpose of enhancing their employment potential.

Karmanos Cancer Center:  $60,000 for the third year of a three year, $150,000 grant to develop the health knowledge and cancer screenings among Orthodox Jewish women.

St. Joseph Mercy Oakland:  $40,000 for the second year of a three-year, $100,000 grant to provide access to dental services to uninsured individuals while also providing an opportunity for recent dental graduates to gain experience in hospital-based dental care.

 

About The Jewish Fund

The Jewish Fund was established in 1997 from the sale proceeds of Sinai Hospital to the Detroit Medical Center. Sinai Hospital was a Jewish community funded facility that grew into one of metropolitan Detroit’s top health care institutions. As a legacy of Sinai Hospital, The Jewish Fund continues the tradition of assuring excellent and compassionate care for those in need in Metropolitan Detroit through its annual grant-making.

Sinai Hospital’s opening in 1953 was the realization of a dream for Detroit’s Jewish community. Its sale in 1997 was not the end of that dream but rather its transformation into another institution of excellence – The Jewish Fund – an institution uniquely designed to perpetuate and proliferate the Sinai dream through stewardship and innovation. In recognition of Sinai’s location in Detroit and its diverse patient base and staff, The Jewish Fund was created as a resource for the entire community, devoted to supporting vulnerable Jews as well as to supporting the health needs of the broader community and enhancing positive relations between the Jewish community and Detroit.

 

11/2013

The Jewish Fund Announces New Grant Awards & New Board Positions.