November 18, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

press-release-11182014
From left to right: Margo Pernick, Leor Barak, Karen Sosnick Schoenberg, Anna Kohn and Dr. Richard Krugel

Bloomfield Hills, MI— At its November 18, 2014 board meeting, The Jewish Fund approved a total of $1,054,900 in grant awards, including $331,300 for continuation of multi-year grants and $773,600 in new grants. The board also elected Karen Sosnick Schoenberg of Birmingham, MI as its Chairman and Nancy Grosfeld of Bloomfield Hills as its Vice-Chair, for terms beginning in January 2015. Ms. Sosnick Schoenberg is the daughter of founding co-chair of The Jewish Fund, Robert Sosnick. Newly elected or re-elected board members are Mark Davidoff of West Bloomfield, Anessa Kramer of Bloomfield Hills, Dr. Richard Krugel of Bloomfield Hills, Mark Schlussel of Southfield and Judge Helene White of Detroit. At its annual meeting held immediately following the board meeting, the annual Robert Sosnick Award of Excellence was presented to the Isaac Agree Downtown Synagogue. President, Leor Barak and Director, Anna Kohn, accepted the award on behalf of the organization. The following grants were approved:

Approved New Grants:

Henry Ford Health System: $25,000 challenge grant for the first year of a three-year, $75,000 grant to support the Women Inspired Neighborhood (WIN) Network, which will lead to improved rates of infant survival.

Jewish Community Center of Metropolitan Detroit: $157,500 for the first year of a three-year, $507,500 grant to assist with the financial and operational transition of the organization.

Jewish Family Service: $127,100 for the first year of a three-year, $486,200 grant to enhance and grow aging in place services through assistive technology.

Jewish Family Service: $200,000 for a one-year grant to support flood relief efforts for Jewish families impacted by the 2014 flooding in south Oakland County.

Jewish Family Service: $54,200 for the first year of a two-year, $94,200 grant to foster greater cultural competency, accessibility and responsiveness of available social services targeting the Orthodox Jewish community.

Mariners Inn: $42,200 for the first year of a three-year, $84,800 grant to address issues of young adult homelessness, along with substance abuse and mental health.

Wayne County Children’s Access Program: $50,000 for the first year of a three-year grant of $150,000 to improve health outcomes for young children with asthma.

Tamarack Camps: $65,000 for a one-year grant to develop an electronic medical records program and to update the camp clinic facilities.

 

Approved Continuation Grants:

Affirmations: $53,100 for the second year of a three-year, $158,900 grant to improve access to quality healthcare for LGBT people through cultural competency training targeting nurses and other health care professionals.

Detroit Central City Community Mental Health: $60,000 for the second year of a three-year, $180,000 grant to develop its expanded health center.

Friendship Circle: $40,000 for the second year of a three-year, $120,000 grant to develop an Oak Park satellite location for activities for children with special needs.

Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit: $33,500 for the second year of a three-year, $186,000 grant to expand services to better serve Jewish day school students with special needs.

Jewish Senior Life: $44,700 for the third year of a three-year, $187,320 grant to develop a Village model in the Jewish community to encourage aging in place.

Southeastern Michigan Health Association for CLEARCorps Detroit: $70,000 for the second year of a two-year, $150,000 grant to create a sustainable model for reducing asthma and preventing lead poisoning in pre-school children in Detroit.

St. Joseph Mercy Oakland: $30,000 for the third year of a three-year, $120,000 grant to provide access to a full range of dental services to uninsured individuals and people with disabilities.

Tamarack Camps: $65,000 for a one-year grant to provide the hardware to needed for electronic medical records and to update the clinic.


About The Jewish Fund

The Jewish Fund was established in 1997 from the sale proceeds of Sinai Hospital to the Detroit Medical Center. Sinai Hospital was a Jewish community funded facility that grew into one of metropolitan Detroit’s top health care institutions. As a legacy of Sinai Hospital, The Jewish Fund continues the tradition of assuring excellent and compassionate care for those in need in Metropolitan Detroit through its annual grant-making.

Sinai Hospital’s opening in 1953 was the realization of a dream for Detroit’s Jewish community. Its sale in 1997 was not the end of that dream but rather its transformation into another institution of excellence – The Jewish Fund – an institution uniquely designed to perpetuate and proliferate the Sinai dream through stewardship and innovation. In recognition of Sinai’s location in Detroit and its diverse patient base and staff, The Jewish Fund was created as a resource for the entire community, devoted to supporting vulnerable Jews as well as to supporting the health needs of the broader community and enhancing positive relations between the Jewish community and Detroit.

The Jewish Fund Announces New Grant Awards, New Board Positions, and Selection of Robert Sosnick Awardee.