AUGUST 2006

For more information, contact Jodee Fishman Raines, (248) 203-1487

At its August 15th board meeting, The Jewish Fund approved $1,375,028 in grant payments for 19 primarily health-related programs.

A $250,000 grant to the Jewish Federation’s Israel Emergency Campaign will help relocate children to safe areas and support the elderly and disabled that are unable to move. According to Jewish Fund Board Chair, Robert Naftaly, “While as a legacy of Sinai Hospital The Jewish Fund’s mission is to support programs locally, the Board unanimously and passionately supported this contribution. We have not seen Israel in such crisis since the Fund was created, and could not refuse the cry for assistance to Israeli children and elderly who have suffered from the conflict.”

Three grants will help create important new services in the Detroit Jewish community. A three year, $185,000 grant will enable Jewish Hospice & Chaplaincy Network to develop a palliative care program to help non-hospice, terminally ill patients. Another three year grant, in the amount of $127,500 jointly to Yeshivas Darchei Torah, Beth Yehudah and Akiva, will help improve the quality of physical education programs in the Orthodox Jewish day schools. A third three year grant will provide $75,000 to Kadima to work with Jewish Family Service to pilot a support program for families of children who struggle with emotional disorders.

Grants also will support health-related programs in the broader community. A two-year, $100,000 grant will support two sites (Rose Hill Center/Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center and Henry Ford Health System) of a $4 million state-wide initiative designed to improve the quality of mental health treatment by implementing standards for evidence-based medication practices. A $75,000 grant will enable the Detroit Science Center to build an interactive exhibit that will get children exercising while educating them about the importance of exercise and nutrition. A three-year, $82,000 grant will promote the inclusion of adults with disabilities in the creation and performance of community-based theatre at Matrix Theatre Company in southwest Detroit.

The remaining grants will address the needs of Holocaust Survivors, children with special needs, frail older adults, and people lacking health insurance ranging from working poor Jewish families to homeless people in Pontiac.

The Jewish Fund was created in 1996 from proceeds of the sale of Sinai Hospital to the Detroit Medical Center and has since awarded $32.7 million in grants to expand health and human services to residents of metropolitan Detroit.

Following is a complete listing of the dollars allocated and purposes of the latest awards.

  1. Detroit Science Center: $75,000 for one year to develop a new, interactive exhibit on physical fitness and nutrition.
  2. Fresh Air Society: $17,000 for one year to purchase a mini-van for medical purposes at Camp Tamarack.
  3. Friendship Circle: $35,000 for the second year of a two year grant for an adult volunteer coordinator for the new Life Village.
  4. Gary Burnstein Community Health Clinic: $45,000 for the second year of a three year grant to provide start up costs for this new free medical clinic in Pontiac.
  5. Hillel Day School: $15,000 for the final year of a three year grant to contract with Jewish Family Service for social work services in the middle school.
  6. Humanitarian Aid Foundation: $25,000 for one year to support in-home services for holocaust survivors in metro Detroit. The grant will be matched by The Humanitarian Aid Foundation and passed through to Jewish Family Service.
  7. Jewish Apartments & Services: $150,000 for the fifth year of a ten year grant to subsidize rent for 30 low-income seniors at the Norma Jean and Edward Meer Apartments.
  8. Jewish Apartments & Services: $35,000 for the second year of a two year grant to staff the expansion of the Coville Apartments to provide supportive living to 36 older adults in Oak Park.
  9. Jewish Community Center: $55,000 for one year for bridge funding for Kids All Together to include children with special needs in recreation programs.
  10. Jewish Family Service: $67,000 for the ninth year for an Escorted Transportation program for frail older adults. This includes a one-time $10,000 supplemental grant to offset the higher cost of gasoline.
  11. Jewish Family Service: $288,528 for the third year of a three year grant for Project Chessed, a network of free and reduced price medical care for uninsured Jewish adults in metro Detroit.
  12. Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit: $250,000 for the Israel Emergency Campaign to help relocate children to safe areas and support the elderly and disabled that are unable to move.
  13. Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit: $18,000 for one year, matching a Federation grant of $18,000, for a follow up study to the Jewish Population Study regarding older adult services.
  14. Jewish Home and Aging Services: $17,000 for the second year of a three year grant for a volunteer friendly visitor program for homebound holocaust survivors.
  15. Jewish Hospice & Chaplaincy Network: Up to $185,000 over three years to develop a palliative care program for the Detroit Jewish community: $80,000 in 2006.
  16. Kadima/JFS: $68,000 over three years to create a support program for families of children who struggle with emotional disorders: $25,000 in 2006.
  17. Matrix Theater Company: $82,000 over three years to include people with special needs in community-based theatre productions: $30,000 in 2006.
  18. Rose Hill Center: $100,000 over two years ($50,000/year) to support the DMC/WSU/Rose Hill and Henry Ford Health System sites of a program designed to implement, support and measure the use of evidence-based practices for Michigan residents with mental illness.
  19. Yeshivas Darchei Torah/Beth Yehudah/Akiva: $127,500 over three years to develop and expand physical education programs in the Orthodox Jewish day schools: $97,500 in 2006.

END

The Jewish Fund Approves $1,375,028 in Grant Payments