The Jewish Fund Announces New Grants, including Support of Jewish Federation’s Centennial Campaign and Expansion of Nurse Family Partnership in Detroit

Bloomfield Hills, MI At its May 13, 2014 board meeting, The Jewish Fund approved a total of $2,247,303 in grant awards for 2014-2015, including $1,075,653 for continuation of multi-year grants and $1,171,650 in new grants.

Grants targeting early childhood health intervention, a recently developed priority in its general community grants, include a three-year grant to the Detroit Wayne County Health Authority totaling $1,166.223 to expand its successful Nurse Family Partnership program, a national nurse home visitor program for at-risk first time pregnant mothers and fathers.  Intensive services directed at improving the quality of life for children and families continues until the children are two years old.

The Jewish Fund also approved a grant of up to $500,000 to incentivize donations to the Federation’s Centennial Campaign that support the health and welfare of at-risk Jewish community members. Funds will “front-load” donor gifts in order to launch and/or expand programs and services that require income from newly established endowment gifts. The Jewish Fund also awarded an additional $500,000 for one year to support the programs funded through Federation’s Foundation for Our Jewish Elderly, which are in-home support services, adult day care and escorted transportation.

The complete list of approved grants follows:

New Grants:

Children’s Hospital of Michigan Foundation: $39,995 for the first year of a three-year, $119,985 grant to support the Hamtramck School-Based Health Center.

Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan:  $75,000 for the first year of a two-year, $150,000 grant to join a funding collaborative of numerous foundations, in support of the Detroit Head Start Early Childhood Innovation Fund.

Detroit Wayne County Health Authority:  $378,173 for the first year of a three-year $1,166,223 grant to expand the Nurse-Family Partnership program in Detroit.

Ruth Ellis Center:  $32,500 for a one-year grant to provide staff support for its planned new health center

Jewish Family Service:  $75,982 for the first year of a three-year, $115,768 grant to develop and implement a suicide prevention and response program for the Jewish community.

Jewish Family Service:  $50,000 for the first year of a three-year, $112,500 grant to facilitate the enrollment of low-income/at-risk members of the Jewish community in health insurance programs.

Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit:  Up to $500,000 for a three-year challenge grant to its Centennial fundraising campaign for at-risk Jewish community residents.

Project Healthy Community:  $20,000 for the first year of a three-year, $60,000 grant to support the hiring of an administrative assistant to support its operations

Continuation Grants

Ferncare Free Clinic:  $7,000 for the second year of a three-year, $21,000 grant to support the expansion of the clinic’s hours of operation of two days per month to three days per month.

Fresh Air Society (Tamarack Camps): $48,125 for the third year of a three-year, $161,875 grant to hire a Jewish community nurse to work at Tamarack Camps, Hillel Day School and the Jewish Community Center.

Hillel of Metro Detroit:  $35,500 for the second year of a two-year, $71,000 grant to engage and excite Jewish college students in metropolitan Detroit in Jewish activities within the city of Detroit.

Isaac Agree Downtown Synagogue:  $88,000 for the third year of a three-year, $250,000 grant to hire a program director, to develop a strategic plan, and support expanded programs and activities.

JARC:  $50,000 for the third year of a three-year, $150,000 grant to hire staff to meet current and future growth needs.

Jewish Hospice & Chaplaincy Network:  $50,000 for the second year of a three-year, $150,000 grant to support general operations of the organization.

Jewish Vocational Service & Community Workshop:  $33,582 for the second year of a three-year, $101,776 grant to expand Memory Club services at its Southfield site and at the Jewish Community Center in West Bloomfield.

Jewish Vocational Service & Community Workshop:  $58,998 for the second year of a two-year, $117,248 grant to provide career counseling for young Orthodox Jewish men who are pursuing vocational options.

Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit:  $500,000 for the third year of a three-year, $1,500,000 grant to support the Foundation for Our Jewish Elderly, which directs these funds to Jewish Senior Life, Jewish Family Services and JVS to support in-home support services, adult day care and escorted transported for frail older adults.

Kadima:  $60,000 for the second year of a three-year, $180,000 grant to support the launch of a new program to help young adults diagnosed with co-occurring mental illness and substance abuse.

Michigan Roundtable for Diversity & Inclusion:  $8,000 for the second year of a two-year, $15,000 grant to develop an exhibit presenting the Jewish experience in the history of housing discrimination in Detroit.

National Council of Jewish Women:  $4,800 for the second year of a three-year, $14,750 grant to provide temporary kosher housing for women and their children in need of housing due to domestic abuse situations.

National Council of the United States Society of St. Vincent DePaul:  $30,000 for the second year of a three-year, $90,000 grant to support operating expenses for its dental clinic.

Starfish Family Services:  $25,000 for the third year of a three-year, $125,000 grant to improve maternal mental health and parenting skills for at-risk mothers living in Inkster.

William Beaumont Hospital:  $43,812 for the second year of a three-year, $120,000 grant to increase overall health of underinsured and uninsured Brightmoor residents through the Brightmoor Health Collaborative.

World Medical Relief:  $50,000 for the third year extension of a two year, $100,000 grant to provide affordable prescription drugs to low-income uninsured and underinsured adults.

The Jewish Fund was established in 1997 from the sale proceeds of Sinai Hospital of Detroit to the Detroit Medical Center.  Sinai Hospital was a Jewish community funded facility that grew into one of Metro Detroit’s top health care institutions.

As a legacy of Sinai Hospital, the Jewish Fund continues to support community programs and services that help at-risk individuals improve their health and human condition.

 

– May 13, 2014 –

The Jewish Fund Announces New Grants, including Support of Jewish Federation’s Centennial Campaign and Expansion of Nurse Family Partnership in Detroit